More headbadge lust: CCM Cleveland

More headbadge lust: CCM Cleveland

Check this baby out:

I haven’t been able to find any images of Canada Cycle & Motor Co’s Cleveland model online. Cleveland seems to be better known as an American-built motorcycle. A 2002 post on the OldRoads forum refers to a 1929 version of the Cleveland that had a double bar and double fork (double fork? whatever does that mean?), and says there’s one in the collection at the Canadian Museum of Science. That poster probably means the Canada Science & Technology Museum in Ottawa, who say that CCM named their version of the Cleveland after forerunner company Lozier’s version …and there are some gorgeous photos of a Lozier Cleveland with an extremely similar headbadge in a forum post over at the CABE. I love the simple black paint job, with the pop of colour behind the pierced metal headbadge – yum. A single-bar version of the Cleveland similar to what’s in those photos is described in this auction of a CCM collection by a Guelph-area auctioneer.

4 thoughts on “More headbadge lust: CCM Cleveland

  1. Hello Deborah, the CCM company was an amalgamation of several existing Cycle companies in 1899. Some of these companies were Massey (Massey Harris), Columbia, and Cleveland. In the early days, CCM made bicycles using various names besides simply CCM. One of these was the CCM Cleveland. CCM kept the various brands around until about 1939. In the 1930’s, the differnt brands of CCM’s were merely different headbadges stuck on the same bicycles, but in the early years, each CCM brand had different distinctive characteristics. These included various styles of front forks and alternative striping on the wooden rims that were available until 1927. Some CCM brands were of higher quality, such as Columbia, Cleveland, and Perfect. Others were cheaper models (by about 4 to 6 dollars), such as Rambler and Crescent. Different shops in the same city would often carry different “brands” of CCM’s (something like Ford and Mercury car dealerships). Department stores and hardwares also had many other brands of CCM bicycles made specifically for them (such as CCM Crown). The headbadge that you missed on Ebay was from the mid to late 1930’s. If you must have one, try contacting International Cycle in Edmonton or ask the owner, Bernie, how to get in touch with John Williamson.
    Regards,
    J.W.

  2. John – thank you so much for the information! My cobloggers Nicki and Angel have later (1951 and 1971) CCM loopframes – but I love knowing more about their historical context. Cheers!

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