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Winnie identified? CCM-made Garry bicycles

Winnie identified? CCM-made Garry bicycles

You remember Nicki’s 1950s CCM-made bike (Winnie), which doesn’t have a CCM chainwheel? Instead it has a cloverleaf chainwheel, similar to the one you see on some Schwinns but with 4 ovals instead of 4 circles:

 
I think I might have sussed out why: she’s a CCM-made Garry bicycle, manufactured for J.H. Ashdown Hardware of Winnipeg. Yup, Winnipeg. So her name is ever so appropriate!

Here’s how I figured it out:

This headbadge, with the rivet holes on the sides like the CCM badges have, is up for auction on eBay. It reads:

J.H. Ashdown Hardware Co.  
GARRY
Winnipeg
Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary, & Edmonton

No bidding on it, collectors, we’re determined to snag it for Nicki!

A search on Garry bicycles turned up this thread on CCM bikes, which mentions that Canada Cycle & Motor Co. was the manufacturer for Garry bicycles. {Aside: It also mentions that Daniel Massey (founder of Massey-Harris, one of the companies that was a progenitor of CCM) was a brother of actor Raymond Massey – who I’m supposedly distantly related to! I’ll have to follow that trail and see if the family connection with CCM is real.}

The search for Garry bicycles also turned up these three Flikr photos of a blue Garry loop-frame bike in hard shape. The photos aren’t very high resolution, and are taken from the wrong side of the bike, but the chainwheel looks just like Winnie’s! And so does the frame, right down to the attachment of the chainguard!

(for comparison with the Flikr photos)

Bike pron: closeup of the way the chainguard is mounted to Winnie’s frame. 

A full history of the J.H. Ashdown Hardware Company and its proprietor’s huge role in the early years of the city of Winnipeg can be found on the Manitoba Historical Society website. At their height they had retail shops and wholesale warehouses in every city in the Canadian Prairies. “Garry” would refer to Fort Garry, the fur-trading fort that was the first European settlement in the area.

Introducing Nicki and her loop-frame… and a little Canadian bicycle history

Introducing Nicki and her loop-frame… and a little Canadian bicycle history

 
I spent part of this afternoon checking out this lovely creature with Angel and Nicki. The Kijiji ad only said Antique Bike, so the single photo was what caught our eye. It looked superficially like 40s or 50s Raleigh-type loop frame – very similar to Mary Poppins – but really, it could have been manufactured by almost anyone. We knew from the photo that it had a coaster brake, vinyl saddle, bottle-generator light set, Wald-type wire basket, and clamp-style rear rack. So we went to see. Then Nicki bought it. The former owner’s earliest memories of it are from about 1957 in Westlock (near Edmonton).

The view from the front. Yes, the tires are both flat.

The lack of headbadge will make identification trickier. You can see here that there’s paint on the chromed fork crown, and someone seriously MacGyvered that basket to get it to stay on. I think Nicki wants to remove it and replace it with a period-appropriate one.

The chainring is one I hadn’t seen anywhere: the closest I’ve found online is 1940s USA unknown manufacturer, according to the chainwheel tattoo project page (aside: that chainwheel sleeve is going to be *hot*). The cranks are cotterless, and the replaceable rubber pads on the left and right pedals don’t match each other. Hopefully we’ll find an identifying stamp when we’re cleaning the crankset. I think we’re going to install the Pletcher kickstand that came with Bert on here too.

The single-speed coaster-brake hub has a metal oiler cap, and is stamped CANADIAN PAT. 1937 – it turns out you can read the actual patent online. Turns out this single coaster hub was manufactured by The Canada Cycle and Motor Company, now known simply as hockey-equipment makers CCM. A little history of CCM’s cycle division can be found at Wikipedia and the Canada Science and Technology Museum website.

The tires read NEW IRC ROADSTER, SIZE 700 x 38, 28 x 1-1/2 CANADIAN SIZE. That valve for the inner tube is a harder-to-find Presta valve. No marks that we found on the painted rims. Notice that there’s some red paint on the spoke nipples – evidence of repainting, or just sloppy work on the factory floor?

The vinyl seat is in astonishingly good shape if it’s original. It’s the metal-pan dual-spring variety, painted black underneath, not a trace of rust.
I love the English-made Miller bullet-shaped chromed dynamo lights. 
No idea if they work. 
I suspect that the black Pletcher-style rear rack isn’t original.

After some research online, we now think that this might be a Raleigh-manufactured Eaton’s Glider. Sheldon Brown is remarkably silent about the Glider, saying only that it was a Raleigh-made house brand of Eaton’s in Canada, so let me provide you with some context.

To quote Raleigh Chopper Info, talking about rebranding of Raleigh bicycles in Canada:

However, the largest re-branding operation carried out in Canada was through the Eaton chain of department stores. Eatons were a large department store, based in the larger cities in Canada. Formed in 1869, Eatons were one of the first large Canadian owned Department stores, but of course one factor hindered their growth, Canada is a very large country, and its small population was very widespread. The answer was the mail order catalogue. The Eatons catalogue became a way of life for Canadian families throughout the early decades, and absolutely everything was available from it. Eatons realised early on that it needed a good reliable range of bicycles to sell. With no dealer network to service warranties, any defective items had to be mailed back to Eatons. This meant reliability in everything they sold was a priority. Eatons turned to England’s Raleigh to supply a range of bikes for sale through the catalogues. Raleigh supplied a range of bike called the “Glider”. These bikes were built to Raleigh standards at the Nottingham factory and badged up as “Eaton Gliders”. This relationship proved a success, Eatons got a reliable supply of good quality bikes, and Raleigh got an independent widespread distribution network.

 Gliders included the standard Raleigh 3-speed, as this owner notes:

I noticed that this bike resembled a typical Raleigh Sports (of which my Raleigh Superbe is an upgraded version), in that it had a pointy front fender, Sturmey Archer hub (dated 10 – 72), and the whole geometry just looked very familiar. The name on it said “Eaton’s Glider”, and Eaton’s was until recently one of Canada’s largest department store chains. I found out later that Raleigh supplied all of Eaton’s bikes, starting way back in the 1920’s! So, this one was basically a re-badged Raleigh Sports.

Loop-frame ladies’ Gliders were also offered, as this owner’s bike shows (follow the link for his photos for comparison to Nicki’s bike).

So what about the tires, non-SA hub, non-Raleigh chainwheel, and so forth? Well, if you look at the photos above, the bike looks like it was repainted at some point. Here’s our theory: somebody left the bike out all winter for a couple of years when they were no longer using it, then it got new tires, a new seat, new handles, replacement bottom bracket set, and a new paint job – and possibly a new chain guard – sometime in the 1950s. This might sound far-fetched, except that a Glider with similar replacement parts to this one has been documented by a user on the OldRoads forum (about 1/3 of the way down the page).

The way to confirm this hypothesis will be to see if we can find the frame serial numbers in the Raleigh database, compare the frame and handlebar measurements to mine to confirm they’re identical, and see if there are twin rivet holes where the Eaton’s Glider headbadge would have gone.

An alternative hypothesis, and a simpler story, is that this is a CCM-built bicycle with CCM parts. Occam’s Razor says that’s more likely, after all. If we disconfirm our Glider hypothesis with measurements, I think we’ll definitely need to research the bikes listed by the Canada Science and Technology Museum: the Cleveland, Silver Ribbon, Ivanhoe, Perfect, Columbia, Rambler, and so on.

Bike cleaning party tomorrow – stay tuned!

Update 1: Flikr seems to be siding with the Occam’s Razor hypothesis that this is a CCM bike. No loop-frames for comparison, but check this stuff out:

First off, for rivet hole placement where the headbadge should be:
– the classic CCM headbadge:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/merk62/3630523922/
– an alternative (off-label) headbadge with same rivet hole spacing:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mistagregory/273856877/

Example 1:
– same chromed fork crown:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/83868261@N00/3026061907/
– and same cranks (different chainwheel) & chainguard:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/83868261@N00/3026060387/in/set-72157608993279125/
– and same coaster hub:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/83868261@N00/3026063717/
– on this balloon-tire CCM cruiser:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/83868261@N00/3289051145/in/set-72157608993279125/

Example 2:
– same fork crown:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tobeinspired/4264764043/
– possible missing decal:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tobeinspired/4265513502/in/photostream/
– another headbadge beauty shot, note the pinstriping:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tobeinspired/4265513554/
– and same chainguard and rear rack, all on this 1942 CCM Rambler:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tobeinspired/4265518540/

Confirmation one way or the other tomorrow afternoon…

Update 2: I found some more CCM goodies through a Google Images search.

First of all, Gerry Lauzon at howtofixbikes.ca has an indispensable post about finding his 1950 CCM ladies-frame bike, which includes serial number information. The photos show a bicycle that’s very similar to Nicki’s. He went on to do a series of posts at a separate blog about the restoration and rebuild process for “Victoria” that’s pretty interesting reading.

It just so happens that we took a photo of the serial number. It’s a bit blurry, but it looks to me like it’s xxxxxC, which corresponds to a 1951 manufacture date.

Montreal’s La Bicycletterie J.R. have great photos right now of another restored 1950 CCM loop-frame bicycle that they’re selling, including one of a more recent headbadge than seen in the Flikr examples, with a red-painted background and the same rivet spacing as the others. Again, the bike looks eerily like Nicki’s, right down to the red tire rims with white pinstripes. I love that they’ve swapped out the plastic handles for cork ones. Yum.

The Canadian Design Resource post on the CCM Imperial Mark II includes a great photo of that same CCM headbadge, sans red paint, and CCM-marked fork crown – and some post-1960 serial number information in the comments.

Finally, one more neat link: North Vancouver’s HUKK Bikes have photos of a 1940s CCM bicycle they sold which features an original painted headbadge, which was used instead of the embossed metal one due to rationing.

My money is now on this lovely bicycle being a 1951 CCM. We’ll find out for sure tomorrow, I guess. So, what should we name her?

Pictures of Ms Daisy

Pictures of Ms Daisy

Apologies off the bat for the poor quality of these pictures, I guess our camera is pretty outdated now, and am pretty sure I could get better zoom pictures with my phone (perhaps will try).

A close up of the only indentification I can find, not very helpful in the ways that I’ve searched, but perhaps someone else will have a better idea of WHERE to search or what to search for…Yeah?

The other form of identification on the bike, sadly in actuality it is just an abbreviated form of “Pro Tour” logo. At least you can see my pretty fenders here though, lovely cherry red everywhere 🙂

Out of focus yes, but this is the last version of the logo I have, again nothing specific, and the lack of manufacturer identity has really started to irk me. REALLY. Started. To. Irk. Me. Oh well…

My favourite (ok one of my favourite) parts of my bike is the chain guard. Regardless of whether Daisy is a retro/vintage/whatever type of bicycle, the chain guard gives her this bit of class that I love to bits. Bits and pieces. Plus having the chain covered means more cute biking clothes for me! (and less worry of said things getting AS tangled!)

Upon today’s pictures I discovered the rear fender that rubs against the tire actually has worn the tire a very little, but nothing serious that would need fixing right now vs another day. I forgot to get a picture of the handle bars, but think bmx-style grips from the 80’s that would’ve been on your bike (as a kid):

 Except mine are dirtier and just not pretty at all. I’d love to get some lovely LOVELY ones with intricacies that only I’d notice (or another biker girl who’d actually be up close and personal with daisy and notice them)…anyone have any suggestions?
Those are all the pictures I have for now, I need a better macro type zoomability to be able to show off any of the parts with identification on them…though I’m almost at a point where I hold little hope for much more than my bike having existed (because I know this much!)
Ms Daisy, a brief intro…

Ms Daisy, a brief intro…

Unlike Deborah’s wonderful researched entries with wonderful pictures and information, I have very little to say about Ms Daisy. I’ve tried my best to do research but apparently “Pro Tour” and bike means a lot of things NOT to do with retro-ish bicycles. Go figure 😛

So here’s what I do have, *right now* 1 lovely picture I took the day I bought her, with my blackberry no less:

The only identifiers I’ve been able to notice is “Pro Tour” on the bottom diagonal bar, plus a sticker with “PT” on the one vertical bar. I plan on going to capture better images of these (since my camera now has batteries) so I can better research ANY kind of history with my bike.
She’s also in need of lots of attention, I’m not entirely sure how long the previous owners had her sit (or where for that matter) but I’m sure she needs new tubes (and possibly new tires as they seem dry and worn) and definitely needs some brackets straightened. Specifically one fender wire/bracket – not sure on specific wording – is bent or crooked which makes the tire rub just a little on the fender, I haven’t noticed any signs of wear on that side of the tire. I don’t think it’s a damaging kind of rub, but when I ride I can hear it, and that’s enough to drive me bonkers!
Next spring (or possibly over winter as I imagine I’ll have more time to fiddle, but less options for purchasing…) I plan on on replacing the handle bar covers – I’d prefer to stick with the white, but avoid the BMX feel that they have now. And I’ll reassess the seat as I go, I’d probably put the seat on the last replacement since it is infact in good condition but isn’t exactly the comfiest of seats out there. And finally, I’ll need a basket for the front! My first thought was to go with a wicker type basket, but now I’m thinking based on what Deborah found for basket liners that if I could learn to make my own it’d be even more original of me (and cuter – and washable!) and make Daisy even better.
Next up: getting more pictures, I’m going to tackle as many identifiers as I can so I can find out *who* my bike is/was. I tweeted that a few days ago and (although briefly) was made fun of it, but I feel so attached to her already that I want to put and identity to the bike. She NEEDS a story!!
Mary Poppins: a 1966 Phillips loop-frame bike

Mary Poppins: a 1966 Phillips loop-frame bike

Now that my children are getting old enough to cycle faster than I can walk, it’s high time I replaced the mountain bike that was stolen (along with every other bike in the apartment building by someone impersonating a construction worker) about a decade ago. So I’m eternally grateful to Angel for alerting me to the posting on Kijiji that made me the proud owner of this step-through, loop-frame town bike:

newoldbike


Isn’t it lovely? A slightly eccentric English lady bike. I’ve named it (her) Mary Poppins, since as Angel pointed out, she’s the Mary Poppins of bikes. The fellow who sold her to me (thanks Chris!) told me she was from the 1960s, has her original finishes and a coaster brake, and was built by Phillips, who were bought out by Raleigh later on. She does need a little TLC, mainly rust removal and paint touchup, but not much.

I did a little research online, and here’s what I learned about Miss Mary:

DSCF1701

This headbadge may date her to about 1965, according to a Flikr set of another Phillips bike. Phillips was purchased by Raleigh in 1960, and from the Spring of 1961 on the bikes were made in Nottingham at Raleigh’s 40-acre factory instead of the Phillips bikeworks near Birmingham. Raleigh continued to make Phillips-branded bikes for export until the 1980s (the wiki page implies), and some collectors look down on them as poor cousins to the higher-quality Raleigh-branded bikes. Whatever. By today’s standards, the build quality is impressive regardless.

DSCF1713
Note the chrome trim on this mudflap – mmmm. This style of mudguard was made by Speedwell and date the bike to the 50s or 60s, according to the information in current eBay listings and Flikr posts. A lot of the steel frame, and the tyre rims, is chromed. The tyre rims are marked STURMEY ARCHER *ENGLAND F250 28 x 1 1/2* (ie, they’re 635mm), and the tyres are marked SEMPERIT, Made In Austria, Super Elite (so they’re probably not original – would likely have been Dunlop when the bike was first sold). The two-tone vinyl mattress saddle was made by Brooks (who, like both Phillips and Sturmey-Archer, were owned at the time by Raleigh’s parent company, TI), and the white plastic grips were probably made by Dare. The kickstand is marked PLETCHER, who were/are a Swiss manufacturer. The basket isn’t marked, and appears to be made of aluminum.
For local historians, it bears a green “repairs” sticker from Premier Cycle & Sport Shop. Anyone know of them?
DSCF1715
I haven’t seen any photos online of similar full-rubber chrome-edged pedals yet. The figure in the middle has an R marked on it, so they’re probably 1960s-era Raleigh pedals. [Update: there are other pedals on eBay right now with the same crest on them, but less wear so it’s easier to make out in the photos, and the seller identifies them as being Raleigh Industries.]
If my bike were a three-speed, this article from oldroads.com would help me identify it much more easily. But a single-speed mechanism with a coaster brake means I’m out of luck unless I can find a serial number that matches what’s in the article. [Update: there is a serial number stamped onto the frame below the saddle: 3464230. Sadly that tells me nothing. The coaster brake has a plastic-stoppered hole for adding oil, and is marked: ENGLAND STURMEY ARCHER SC (in the bottom triangle) 11   6 (running perpendicular to the 4-triangle logo; if this is month/year, she was probably made in November 1966). SC would be the model number based on the illustration in this article by Sheldon Brown, and according to the official Sturmey-Archer history site, it’s the SC single coaster brake hub, introduced in 1963 and retired in 1978.]

Here’s a shot on Flikr of a bike that’s very similar to mine, down to the aluminum front basket, although the frame isn’t as curvaceous.

Mary’s grey-plastic rear reflector is a mid-60s Phillips part, found in this catalogue (PDF) …but that’s the only part, apart from the headbadge and decals, that I’ve been able to confirm is Phillips for now. [Update: strike that! It’s actually a very discoloured white rubber-cased reflector, with tiny, difficult-to-photograph letters, that identify it as a Fairylites reflector (also TI, also found on Raleighs of the period). Curiouser and curiouser.]

I wonder whether she was a custom order put together from various TI parts, and branded as a Phillips because she was assembled in or for the Canadian market?

Next I need to clean Mary up. Any advice on how best to do that would be greatly appreciated!

(The content of this post was originally published on Deborah’s other blog.)