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Category: wierd ink scanning artifact

Google Books & a 1961 English maintenance manual

Google Books & a 1961 English maintenance manual

Look what is posted on Google Books! I have a hardcopy version I bought through eBay (from a UK seller), and while looking for more information about its London-based publisher I found the Google Books listing. My copy is where the photos and scans in this post came from. There is no version for sale on Google Books *yet*, but once that becomes fully functional, it will be. It looks like there will also be links allowing you to find it (and other books) in your local library or to buy copies for sale.  

Publisher’s information from the back cover.

What a cool way to do the table of contents!

Incidentally, scanning the book on my flatbed scanner gives a bright blue instead of the red seen by the eye and camera – which must be a clue as to which ink was used for printing, although I can’t find anything online that explains the effect. I’m wondering whether it’s one of the lead-containing inks that got vintage children’s books relegated to collectible status under the new CPSIA regulations in the US. Just in case, I’m storing it way out of reach of my kids, and washed my hands well after handling it.

Scanned figure from inside back cover. Not only does the red ink scan as blue, but the paper itself has a blue tint when scanned, which you can still see along the fold after colour-adjusting the image for readability.

Here’s the review I wrote on Google Books:

I have an original copy of this booklet, which is clearly written and has illustrations throughout. It was designed to be a quick reference, carried in the bicycle saddlebag, and it goes through common issues and how to fix them for all parts of the bicycle. If you own an English-made roadster-style bicycle of the period – or a modern bicycle manufactured with the English roadster as its model – you’ll probably find this extremely helpful.

 
Typical of the layout of the interior pages.
These pages show the entire entries for The Pedal and The Chain.

I wonder what other vintage bicycle treasures are lurking in Google’s database?